Healthcare Innovation | Outcomes Research | Implementation and Impact
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One of the unintended consequences of writing this fortnightly newsletter over the last year has been a (dis)proportionate increase in learning new areas of healthcare innovation and questions/curiosities related to these areas. I have also been pleasantly surprised how this has generated new topics for discussions.

Hence this month onwards, Things & Thinks will be in a dialog with a leader in healthcare innovation and we will call it Half & Half. Through this dialog we will get to know some thoughts on healthcare and some on personal leadership journeys from these fascinating people. …


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It won’t be an exaggeration to call 2020 as an epoch-making year for everyone and so it has been for me too. At the beginning of the year, there was the usual looking back at 2019 & making plans for the year to come; but within the first quarter, almost every single of those plans had to be looked at and reworked again, (and again and again). One thing that kept me going was my reading (old habit) and writing (newly found habit). When I look back at my 2020 in lockdowns, social distancing and overall pandemic anxieties, these habits helped me keep sane. …


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Before we begin, wishes to all readers for a happy 2021! This year will continue to be an important year for healthcare in general and more specifically for digital health. I will continue to bring these news through Things & Thinks, with my usual curation of news and then trying to piece together the disparate elements.

If you missed it, I wrote two summaries at the end of last year, one for my 2020 writing and reading and another one about all the prior 2020 Things & Thinks issues; I will be happy to hear your thoughts.

In this eighteenth issue of the newsletter, I bring a case study about ‘algorithmic’ decision making in healthcare and its actual rollout in the field, followed by a fantastic guide that will help any digitization project. I follow these two with the usual dose of digital health news, ending with Chart of the Fortnight and Tweet of the Fortnight. …


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I began curating healthcare news around the end of the first quarter of 2020. With sixteen issues released since then, Things & Thinks has started taking a nicer shape than where it was (at least for me!) In this year-end issue, I reflect on the disparate pieces I curated and three common threads that seem to bind them all. I will be back with some new things and newer thoughts in 2021!

Thread 1-Patch-up innovation doesn’t work, especially in healthcare

  • One big message from the pandemic mayhem is how complex, interlinked and interdependent our world is and how that reflects in the already hyper-linked healthcare system. My suggestion-

I think the starting point can be just to accept these complexities and linkages before starting to tinker with things we don’t yet know and/or fully understand. …


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This is the sixteenth issue of my newsletter-in the first section I bring together some reflections on complexity science and what it means for healthcare. I follow it with an update on cloud services in healthcare. As usual, there’s the curated digital health news section, a Chart of the Fortnight and a Tweet of the Fortnight.

‘No one is an expert’, Complexity science and healthcare

One of the best things that happens while curation and re-reading is how we start seeing common elements that connect seemingly disparate pieces.


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In this issue of my fortnightly newsletter, I have brought together an update from US FDA and some reflections by Bill Gates, with the usual curated news from the digital health world, a Chart of the Fortnight and a Tweet of the Fortnight.

Diversity in Clinical Trials

US FDA released a detailed guidance on enhancing diversity of clinical trial population. The guidelines talk about the following aspects-

  • Broadening eligibility criteria to increase diversity in enrolment
  • Study design and conduct considerations to improve enrolment
  • Considerations for rare disease trials.

As a proponent of digital health technology, I especially like this particular recommendation about study design/conduct-

Make Trial Participation Less Burdensome for…


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TLDR

Real-world data and real-world evidence have become the new catchphrases in healthcare. Due to a combination of new evidence requirements and exponential technology innovations, several use-cases have emerged for applying real-world data in healthcare research and commercial settings for real-world. In this deep-dive, I provide a primer for the field followed by focus on two special aspects- RWE from patient generated data and RWE governance mechanisms worldwide.

Primer on Real World Data and Real World Evidence

Before we get into the details, lets first understand what’s all the fuss about.

What is Real World Data?

Any data that gives us more information about the patient’s health is real-world data. The EU GetReal initiative gets more specific by defining it as ‘an overarching term for data on the effects of health interventions (such as benefits, risks or resource use) that are not collected in the context of conventional randomised controlled trials (RCTs).’ …


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In this issue of my fortnightly newsletter, I write about ever-pervasive nature of healthcare data and some notes on mHealth apps space. I also curate some of the important news from the digital health world, and then end with a Chart of the Fortnight and a Tweet of the Fortnight.

All data is Healthcare data


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TL;DR

mHealth apps are one of the fastest ways to launch products in healthcare innovation however applying the usual app-based metrics will not work in healthcare. DAU/MAU/Churn rate do not count for much in mHealth apps. Investors, payors, and most importantly patients are looking for outcomes and impact. How do we go about it?

Introduction

One striking aspect of healthcare systems globally is the sheer magnitude of issues that are faced by patients, physicians, healthcare providers and other organizations in the field. …


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In this issue of my fortnightly newsletter, I reflect upon healthcare innovation using two different perspectives-repairing after disruptive innovation and time horizon for seeing impact of innovation. I also curate some of the important news from the digital health world, and we end with a Chart of the Fortnight and a Tweet of the Fortnight.

Innovation reflections- Disruptions and Repairing

I read a new report about AI interventions in healthcare, focusing on Sepsis Watch, an innovative AI that helps in managing sepsis. Many of the comments by the authors really hit the bull’s eye.

Innovating in healthcare is fraught with challenges that come with the field-fragmentation, silos and multiple handoffs. When you place an innovative solution in this ‘messy’ environment, there is always a risk that the many hidden, complex interplays (that were not considered/were kept out of development) will add to the usually well known bumps of the change management plans. …

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